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Creating MPI Projects

These instructions use example projects included on both the remote cluster and the StarHPC virtual machine image to create new MPI projects by copying and renaming them. This is the fastest way to create a new MPI project.

Creating MPI projects from scratch

The following guides are for creating a project from scratch and aren't necessary unless you have issues copying one of the included projects or need to create a new project on your personal computer.

NOTE: These instructions assume you have both openmpi and eclipse installed with the Parallel Tools Platform (PTP). Currently this is only possible with a Linux OS.

Switching Workspace Perspective

There are multiple workspace “perspectives” in Eclipse which are useful depending on what you're doing and the type of project you're working with. In general using the correct perspective will present more relevant information in Eclipse and organize your workspace appropriately for the project/task.

There are separate perspectives for C/C++ and Fortran projects. There are also perspectives for running and debugging parallel programs. The instructions below describe how to switch to one of these perspectives and outlines the 4 most common views used for MPI programming in Eclipse.

Using MPI Artifacts

MPI Artifacts provide content assistance for MPI programs in an Eclipse workspace. This includes drop-down access to the MPI API as well as code-completion for MPI. To get started with this feature follow the link below.

Running Parallel Code

After you've created a project and written some code the next thing to do is to run your parallel code. If you're using the standalone virtual machine image, you'll be emulating running on 4 nodes. If you're logged in remotely to the StarHPC cluster you'll be running on 4 networked processors. In both cases the setup is the same. To get started running your parallel code follow the link below.

Parallel Debugging

For when things go wrong in your code, Eclipse PTP also provides a parallel debugger. The debugger launches a separate gnu debugger (gdb) for each process and lets you examine their state at each parallel breakpoint. To get started debugging your parallel code follow the link below.